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How To Increase Sales With Your Own Email Course

By: Kevin Nunley

Kevin Nunley provides marketing advice, copywriting, and promotion packages. See his 10,000 free marketing ideas at DrNunley.com Reach Kevin at kevin@drnunley.com or 801-328-9006.

Millions of people love the Internet because it offers them so much free information.  People used to grab the phone book, pick up a newspaper, or call the library when they had a question. Now vast numbers log on and find the information online.

You can harness this massive and powerful demand for free information.  Use it to build your base of customers and prospects.  Use your ability to provide free information to build image, customer confidence, brand recognition, and sales.

Get and use your own email course.  This is an all-time favorite with Internet users.  Courses can be nothing more than a few successive email messages that give readers information on a particular topic.

Most courses are seven messages long, although some are as short as three messages and many have ten or more.  Use a multiple autoresponder to send your messages automatically.  I find it is best to have a lesson arrive every day or every other day.

If your messages show up every other day, you keep your name and information in front of customers for a full two weeks.  That gives prospects the time they need to carefully consider your offer and decide to buy.  You makes sales in many cases where customers would have forgotten your name, your site, and your offer.

If you don't have a newsletter, offer an email course to keep your information in front of people until it has time to make an impact.

Your email course makes an excellent free bonus for people who subscribe to your newsletter or request your sales information. When the page comes up that says "thanks for subscribing," include a box where people can type their email address to get your free course.

How can you get your own email course?  The easiest way is to offer a course someone else has written.  Many course authors don't mind if you use their course as long as you keep their contact and promotional information in tact.  Ask permission.

Chris McClean has created a service that connects web site owners with free courses.  7LessonCourses.com lets you choose the course you want to offer, insert your ad in the course, then gives you a simple sign-up form to put on your site.

In case you want to create your own course, here are the mechanics:
  1. Pick a problem that lots of your customers struggle with. In my business the big stumpers are getting a site that sells, finding a way to handle email, figuring out search engines, and finding low-cost ways to advertise effectively.

    A course on any of these is guaranteed to bring lots of interested prospects and customers (and you can bet I'm plugging my ads here and there during the course).

    Your course could be on how to complete a basement, how to avoid an IRS audit, how to give your kids straight teeth, or anything else that customers often ask about.

  2. If you don't write or have time to pen your own articles, look for others who have written on the topic. It is perfectly legal to put their ideas in your own words (always proper to give them credit).

    You can also quote the article. It is best to ask in advance, if your course is for commercial purposes. Start your article, then say expert Jane Doe has some valuable information. Include a few paragraphs of what Jane wrote.

    Be careful not to use so much you give away her entire article and spoil her ability to sell the information. Email is by far the most popular feature of the Internet.  Use your own email course to build an audience and promote yourself as someone who knows their field.

© 2001DrNunley.com.

Other Articles by Kevin Nunley

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