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To Hype or Not to Hype

By: Kevin Nunley

Kevin Nunley provides marketing advice, copywriting, and promotion packages. See his 10,000 free marketing ideas at DrNunley.com Reach Kevin at kevin@drnunley.com or 801-328-9006.

If youíve spent any time on the Internet, youíve seen those sites that use hype to sell their products. You canít miss hype, with its exclamation points, bold and caps text, and enthusiasm through the roof. But when is hype appropriate and when is it over the top?

*To Hype - Hype works great for business opportunities and products that appeal to peopleís emotions. The more excited potential customers are about them, the more likely they are to buy or join. Hype appeals to a personís sense of what is possible. It showcases the benefits theyíve always wanted but never thought they would find, all in what you have to offer.

*Not to Hype - The problem with hype is that many people become skeptical when the exclamation points and uppercase words start to fly. Advertisers with products that donít deserve hype tend to use it even more overwhelmingly, trying to make their products seem better than they are. Then, when someone falls victim to the hype, they resent the style of copy for persuading them into their bad purchase.

Hype is all the keeps some business opportunities and products in business. But there are also plenty of businesses out there that survive hype-free. If your product or opportunity deserves hype, then by all means, use it to your best advantage. But donít make unsupportable claims that may get you into hot water later on.

And remember, there are many levels of hype. On a scale of one to ten, a three or a four may work perfectly for you. you.

© 2003 DrNunley.com.

Other Articles by Kevin Nunley

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